Alcohol Addiction Treatment

Alcoholism is one of the most common addictions in America. The social acceptance of drinking alcohol can often lead to denial. If left untreated can lead to severe consequences.

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Alcoholism, also commonly referred to as alcohol dependence or alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a type of addiction characterized by an inability to control their drinking. When people’s drinking is out of their control, they need alcohol to function “normally.” 

It feels impossible for those struggling with this substance use disorder to stop drinking. This chronic dependency on alcohol damages their mental health and physical well-being.

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What is Alcoholism?

Alcoholism, also commonly referred to as alcohol dependence or alcohol use disorder (AUD), is a type of addiction characterized by an inability to control their drinking. When people’s drinking is out of their control, they need alcohol to function “normally.” 

It feels impossible for those struggling with this substance use disorder to stop drinking. This chronic dependency on alcohol damages their mental health and physical well-being.

What are the Causes of Alcohol Addiction?

Several different factors can lead someone to form a dependency on alcohol. Alcohol problems are often rooted in a person’s trauma experiences, but frequent drinking, family members’ history, and underage drinking are also leading causes. 

Drinking alcohol releases dopamine, which makes you feel happy and rewarded. Over time, your brain can start to become dependent on alcohol for dopamine production, causing you to drink more and more to feel normal. 

Alcohol abuse also affects your brain’s serotonin production, which is why so many alcoholics struggle with sleep and frequent mood changes.

Signs of Alcohol Abuse

Like any other substance abuse symptoms, alcohol abuse symptoms can come on subtly. It can start simply with the desire to partake in activities that you know will involve drinkings, like social gatherings or bar trips. 

Once the addiction starts to take hold, you’ll notice that it takes more and more alcohol to have the same effect on you, which means you’re building up a tolerance. Once you’ve developed a tolerance, stopping alcohol can cause withdrawal symptoms.

Physical Symptoms of Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol addiction manifests itself in various ways depending on the person. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Some of the most common physical symptoms of alcoholism include:

  • Blacking out or losing consciousness 

  • Shaking or trembling

  • Experiencing cravings for alcohol

  • Increased anxiety

  • Cirrhosis of the liver

  • Euphoria when intoxicated

  • Nausea and vomiting

  • Increased sweating

Over time, these symptoms can develop into serious physical or psychological illnesses. Long-term alcohol abuse severely damages your internal organs, especially your liver and kidneys. 

Alcoholism also negatively affects your mental health. Alcoholics often experience increased aggression, mood swings, compulsive and self-destructive behavior, paranoia, and more.

Treatment Options for Alcohol Addiction

We know that getting help is intimidating, but several different treatment plan options are available. The most common treatment programs include detox, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation, and outpatient treatment and rehabilitation. 

Detox

No matter what treatment plan you decide works best for you, you will need to go through medical detoxification. During this process, medical professionals will help you overcome the worst of your withdrawal symptoms while the alcohol leaves your body. 

The process only takes a few days for many people, but for long-term heavy drinkers, detoxification can take weeks to complete safely. 

Inpatient Treatment

Inpatient treatment is when a person is admitted to treatment facilities for the duration of their rehabilitation. Going through inpatient treatment allows you to go through around-the-clock monitoring under the supervision of healthcare professionals. 

Inpatient treatment also ensures that you aren’t exposed to the temptation of alcohol. You will receive different treatments for physical and mental health issues, including behavioral health therapy and addictions counseling. 

Inpatient treatment is the safest way to overcome alcohol dependence. Health professionals can give you all of the care and coping skills you need to have a healthy life in this setting.

Outpatient Treatment

Outpatient addiction treatment allows you to get help without being admitted into a treatment facility. This can be through day clinics, outpatient rehabs, therapy, and more. 

Many people who go through outpatient programs also attend local Alcoholics Anonymous programs. This support group helps those struggling with alcoholism feel like they’re not alone and have the morale boost to get clean. 

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a helpline for substance abuse sufferers, recommends seeking a prescription from your doctor to help the recovery process. Your medical provider can prescribe a few different medications to help get you through the recovery, including acamprosate, disulfiram, and naltrexone.

Treatment in the comfort and convenience of your own home by a Celadon Recovery Professional
Or call toll-free and talk confidentially to a Celadon Professional now.
Give us a call anytime day or night:
Treatment in the comfort and convenience of your own home by a Celadon Recovery Professional
Or call toll-free and talk confidentially to a Celadon Professional now.
Give us a call anytime day or night: